How Do You Know When To Pick An Avocado?

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    Growing an avocado tree can take 10 years of love and care before you see any fruits of your labor – literally. Growing our favorite superfruit from pit to produce may well take you the better part of a decade. Once your tree begins to produce fruit, you may start to wonder, how do you know when to pick an avocado?

    When Do You Pick An Avocado?

    After 10 years of caring for your tree in the hopes of growing your own avocados one day, the last thing you want to do is ruin the fruit by picking it at the wrong time. Some fruits grow larger and better the longer we leave them on the mother plant. However, though avocados mature on their parent tree, they don’t begin to ripen until you remove them. Many producers will leave avos on the tree to store them until they are ready to harvest them. Hass avocados can remain on their parent trees for as long as 8 months! 

    green leaf plant in close up photography, pick an avocado

    The longer fruit remains on the tree, the more the avos might lose some of their color and shine. They may also develop rust-colored spots on the skin, but the fruits are still fine to eat.

    Once you pick an avo, it begins to ripen. This softening process takes as little as a few days or as long as a week. The best way to figure out if your avos are done growing is to pick an avocado off your tree and allow it to ripen at room temperature for a few days. Once you can lightly squeeze the skin and the dimples do not immediately fade from the skin, it’s time to make your favorite avocado dish. As long as the fruit softens to a good consistency, isn’t leathery or tough, doesn’t shrivel, and doesn’t taste bitter, the rest of your tree is ready for harvest!

    Remember though, unless you’re ready to eat all those superfruits, the best place to store them is right on the tree.